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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

7 edition of Production ecology of ants and termites found in the catalog.

Production ecology of ants and termites

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  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Eng.], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ants -- Ecology,
  • Termites -- Ecology

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by M. V. Brian.
    SeriesInternational Biological Programme ;, 13
    ContributionsBrian, M. V. 1919-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL568.F7 P7
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvii, 409 p. :
    Number of Pages409
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4906367M
    ISBN 100521215196
    LC Control Number76054061

    Production Ecology of Ants and Termites, Paperback by Brian, Michael Vaughan $ $ Free shipping. Very Good: A book that does not look new and has been read but is in excellent condition. No obvious damage to the cover, with the dust jacket (if applicable) included for hard covers. No missing or damaged pages, no creases or End date: Termites feed on dead plant material, such as wood, leaf litter, roots, dead herbs and grasses, dung, and humus. Some termites are able to digest cellulose (wood) with the assistance of symbiotic (mutually beneficial) bacteria present in the gut of the termites. Other termites use the cellulose to cultivate fungi that are then eaten.

    Social insectsThe fascination of social insectsThe social insects represent one of evolution's most magnificent, successful, and instructive developments. Ever since the behavior of ants, bees, wasps, and termites was first recorded in antiquity, these insects have exerted a powerful hold on our imaginations. Source for information on Social Insects: Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia dictionary. Production ecology of ants and termites. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,

    I want to tell you a little bit more about termites. There are about species of termites on Earth. Termites are related to cockroaches and to the mantids, like the praying mantis, and they're actually, although insects, quite distantly related to ants, wasps, and bees. Wood ants are almost unique among insects in having a largely predictable and easily visible pattern of foraging. This is the result of their mutualistic interaction with tree-dwelling aphids and other sap-sucking insects, requiring foragers to travel regularly between the wood ant nest and persistent feeding sites where they collect honeydew from their mutualists.


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Production ecology of ants and termites Download PDF EPUB FB2

Production Ecology of Ants and Termites - Google Books. Social insects are amongst the most successful species. This study concentrates on the production ecology of ants and termites. Ants and. Book Description This study concentrates on the production ecology of ants and termites.

Ants and termites are highly socialised and their groupings in their most developed form enable them to function as large organisms comparable with the Production ecology of ants and termites book mammals in.

Ecology of Ants and Termites. (Book Reviews: Production Ecology of Ants and Termites)Author: Edward O. Wilson. Near fine hardcover with dust jacket. This account deals critically with production, food and feeding habits, respiration and energy flow, nutrient dynamics and the role of ants and termites in ecosystems.

Previous owner's name stamp on title page. ISBN: This study concentrates on the production ecology of ants and termites. Ants and termites are highly socialised, and their groupings in their most developed form enable them to function as large organisms comparable with the larger mammals in their influence in ecosystems ecosystems Subject Category: Habitats see more details.

In spite of their social mode of life, quantitative investigations are not easy Author: M. Brian. Ecology of Termites. In book: Termites and Sustainable Management, pp As a result of interaction with ants, termites become soft preys. For example, the. This Special Issue will focus on the ecology of termites.

Any topics related to termites and their ecology, including biodiversity, systematics, termite-related symbiosis, termite management, and social organization, are invited from across the globe.

Authors are encouraged to submit relevant research articles, as well as review manuscripts. La Fage JP, Nutting WL () Nutrient dynamics of termites. In: Brain MV (ed) Production ecology of ants and termites. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp Google Scholar Leinaas HP () A haplodiploid analogy in the evolution of termite eusociality.

reply to Lacy. List of non-fiction books with chapters on ants Title Author Year of Publication Publisher Language Subject Notes [Wild Bees, Wasps and Ants and other Stinging Insects] Saunders, Edward: publication date unknown: London: George Routledge & Sons: English: Natural History: A couple of small chapters for the layman Production Ecology of Ants and Termites.

4. Ecology of Termites in Four Paragraphs. Environmentally, the main impact of termites is their role as soil ecosystem engineers in the tropics and subtropics, a function matched on the global scale only by earthworms and ants [1,12,13].

Peakin, G. & Josens, G. in Production Ecology of Ants and Termites, (ed. Brian, M. W.) – (Cambridge university Press, ). Google Scholar. In Production Ecology of Ants and Termites (M.V.

Brian, Ed.), pp. 5–44, Cambridge University Press., Cambridge. Comparative Biology of Fungus Cultivation in Termites and Ants. Pages Nobre, Tânia (et al.). Production Ecology of Ants and Termites.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; pp. – Korb J, Lenz M. Reproductive decision-making in the termite, Cryptotermes secundus (Kalotermitidae), under variable food conditions. The primitive giant northern termite (Mastotermes darwiniensis) exhibits numerous cockroach-like characteristics that are not shared with other termites, such as laying its eggs in rafts and having anal lobes on the wings.

It has been proposed that the Isoptera and Cryptocercidae be grouped in the clade "Xylophagodea".Termites are sometimes called "white ants" but the only resemblance to the.

This book draws the vast diversity of termite adaptations together in the frame- work of a range of greater unresolved biological questions, from genetics through ecology and social behavior to macroevolution, that termites, as such-special insects, can help us answer.

Termites globally are a very important group of animals. They play a central role in the ecology of many tropical and subtropical ecosystems. One way of gauging their significance is by how abundant they are.

There are somewhere between 10 15 and 10 17 termites on earth. - Production Ecology of Ants and Termites Edited by M. Brian Index More information.

Title: Author: Administrator Created Date. from book Ecology of Social Evolution (pp) Ants and termites are the most abundant animals on earth. Their ecological success is attributed to their social life.

Ecology Letters. Many species of invasive ants cause economic impacts in agriculture by forming mutualism with honeydew-producing hemipteran ng ants (e.g., little fire ants on the Big Island and tropical fire ants throughoutHawai'i) threaten human health and tourism,as well as the livelihood ofcrop-growers, landscapers, and e of their painful stings that may cause allergic reactions.

Termite ecology came of age in with the seminal review of Wood and Sands which by considering the quantitative contributions made by termites to the carbon cycle at the landscape level concluded that they were major players in tropical ecosystems.

Subsequent field work in the succeeding two decades was summarised in by Bignell and Eggleton, the most recent review which attempted to.Ants and termites, two unrelated groups of social insects, are known to possess a fairly complex array of ter-penoids in their glandular tissues (Lloyd et al.

Billen et al. ) that may be used by the insects as components of trail pheromones (Janssen et al. ) or in. The book is a new compendium in which leading termite scientists review the advances of the last 30 years in our understanding of phylogeny, fossil records, relationships with cockroaches, social evolution, nesting, behaviour, mutualisms with archaea, protists, bacteria and fungi, nutrition, energy metabolism,population and community ecology, soil conditioning, greenhouse gas production .